TV Review: Homeland S04E10 “13 Hours in Islamabad”

Bullets, blood and belts reigned on Homeland’s lashing return after its two-week hiatus, ricocheting the action inside and outside the embassy that defined the season’s epic battle and closes the grim hour through genuine character moments and a harrowing set-up of its season finale. Time matters the most in “13 Hours in Islamabad”; how the seconds dreadfully dissolve to lifeless bodies as Haissam Haqqani rushes the embassy commandos in turning over the treasured CIA intelligence; how the (10) minutes of inaction left the Americans mortally suffering from the bitter medicine as ISI agent Tasneem Qureshi insinuated; how it took the eponymous torrid hours for Peter Quinn to snap back to the assassin he vehemently hoarded to finish the mission; and how the days counted into Carrie Mathison as the sanctified voice of reason, becoming the anchor of her team at such sinking moment and perhaps the lighthouse for another who has gone rouge. Regardless of allegiances, “13 Hours in Islamabad” is a climatic collective effort that propelled everyone at Carrie’s orbit on their own circles and let their fates be decided. The blistering results were reminiscent of “The Choice” where each character has his/her defining moment moving forward but E10’s not yet the end despite how catastrophic the aftermath is. Definitely worthy the (agonizing) wait, “13 Hours in Islamabad” is the most alive that Homeland has been since S01’s adrenaline-fueled paranoia, not just by the suspenseful kinetic kickoff but also the emotional flurry of every character until the closing minutes. Leaving plenty of fatalities, it’s tough to be optimistic of what Carrie and Quinn could do to win the unkind war but my hope for S04 sustaining such exhilarating momentum in its last two episodes is ever alive and kicking.

 

Straight from the horrendous headline, Homeland staged its fictional version of the 2012 Benghazi attack. U.S. Ambassador Martha Boyd’s life was spared (unlike her actual counterpart) but the 36 American lives lost included Deputy Station Chief John Redmond and young CIA agent Fara Sherazi. Introduced as the bitter and inebriated supposed-to-be successor, Redmond proved to be reliable, as punctuated by his memorable one-liners (“I’m a spy, I know shit.” in delivering Dennis and “I’m with you.” at Carrie during the prisoner exchange). I also like his honesty to her back at the ops room in “From A to B and Back Again”. Meanwhile, Fara just joined the foreign stint; her willingness to learn that tests her idealism was a refreshing perspective from the callousness around her. But her brief shelf life didn’t live up to her character’s potential (Fara’s plate is an opportunity to address a new spin to the typical Muslim roles of the genre). In trying to reason out her death, maybe the catch in the shocking twist is that Fara wasn’t supposed to be there and her being a Muslim who has ties with the CIA irked Haqqani. The grisly siege is destined to produce victims of war out of Fara, John, and the others — the necessary damages which also echoed Aayan’s anticipated but equally devastating death. A part of me retorts that the writers don’t want to develop another female character aside from Carrie. But in the end, the embassy attack is a glaring evidence that Homeland doesn’t balk on taking risks (no one is safe except for the show’s current trifecta) and the war on terror will always be accompanied of irreversible casualties.

 

Martha also stood out in the episode by juggling her responsibilities as the steely diplomat and the wretched wife. No matter how flawed her relationship is to CIA Director Andrew Lockhart and Dennis, together they were symbiotic in fleshing out their characters. I enjoyed watching Martha and Lockhart wrestle their clashing political, diplomatic, and military views which are more reflective of real bureaucratic struggles than the cartoonish charade of warring CIA directors in S03. On the other hand, Homeland produced one of its most confusing and disturbing scenes as Martha consented on Dennis’ final attempt to do the right thing for her. (At first I was bewildered) but discovering his cowardice made Dennis more unbearable and disgusting as painted by Martha’s signature sneer. Death is too merciful for Dennis; he deserved whatever treatment he’ll be indicted back in the U.S. As for Martha and the salvaged Saul Berenson, I have no idea how they’ll thrive when they return, but that’s not to say E10’s conclusion is finite for them. The Carrie-Saul dynamic was rekindled and so much potent this season while there’s more beyond the cigarette talks Carrie and Martha share. Contrast to the scorning public’s impression that she’s a sociopath, Carrie is most involved with the people around her in S04. Her relationships with colleagues, assets, and Pakistani equals were the driving force of the story; directly or not, she moves everyone from their one-dimensional inertia. That’s also to mention the rapport she has built with them, particularly Lockhart whom Carrie comforted after swallowing his own dose of culpability by surrendering the CIA assets list in exchange of Fara’s life. It makes me think of what would Carrie have done if she was in Lockhart’s position (since she’s the only one capable of making pragmatic decisions during highly stressful situations) but like her drone strike order in E06, it was a tough call. The domino effect of fallibility will just prolong their unstable footing in Islamabad, thus the President’s order of retraction from Pakistan. But Carrie can’t go home just yet. Because Quinn.

 

S04 can be dissected on the medium-term conflicts other than Carrie’s, whose arc is the season’s backbone. The first three episodes opened a bigger role for Quinn experiencing PTSD and tried to release himself from the agency, only to be brought back in by Carrie. E04-E06 created an asset out of Aayan whose arc was concluded by a shot in the head. E07-E09 effectively integrated a captive Saul back to the heart of the story. Quinn was sidelined in the middle episodes but for the last quarter, the wheel stirs back to him as he attempts to single-handedly kill Haqqani. Rupert Friend becomes the reliable action man in E10 but aside from showing off his assassin moves, he becomes reinvested to the mission. Haqqani stabbing Fara was Quinn’s tipping point (much like Aayan’s death to Carrie’s) and he was unstoppable, being swift in entrapping Taliban-infested ISI guards. The writers struck again their penchant for role reversal; Quinn tries to make sense out of Carrie’s auto-piloted drone royalty in the first two episodes while Carrie stays behind to return Quinn who’s more dangerously charged as the military man he was in the final two episodes. As foreshadowed by his speech in “About a Boy”, Quinn’s patriotic crusade will just earn him more enemies in the likes of the ISI (the hunt headed by Aasar Khan). How deep Quinn will dig himself into the rabbit hole and how he’ll be able to excavate himself are the burning questions in “Krieg Nicht Lieb” (and possibly E12). The similarity of Carrie and Brody’s conversation in “Goodnight” and Carrie and Quinn’s in “13 Hours in Islamabad” is chilling, but the difference is that Quinn doesn’t need to be saved (and if he does, he wouldn’t want it to be Carrie). I’m glad that the show’s finally unveiling the pre-S02 of Quinn and E10 was just a glimpse of it. Being the inured individual performer he was, Quinn probably has his tools and methods planned out, maybe including his own extraction plan. It would be interesting how Carrie would react to this unleashed version of Quinn and how her approach would be if she joins him, if not their usual ‘fighting fire with fire’ dalliance.

 

Next week’s penultimate episode cages Carrie and Quinn in the most perilous predicament together. Will Quinn succeed in taking down Haqqani? Will Carrie return to the U.S. alone? Perhaps E11 would follow closely the structure of “Big Man in Tehran”, with stakes soaring on its volatile characters. Homeland holds an impressive streak of riveting episodes in its second half. The first 20 minutes of “13 Hours in Islamabad” matches the taut cinematic level while the other half embraces the ensemble in their last ditch for preservation. A gripping fusion of tremendous pay-offs and delirious set-up, E10 was an excellent showcase of action, suspense, and drama that only Homeland best delivers. Here’s to hoping that “Krieg Nicht Lieb” would be kind to whatever heart-stopping scenes it has in store. But I’m not complaining.

 

Next Episode: “Krieg Nicht Lieb”

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TV Review: Homeland S04E06 “From A to B and Back Again”

What happens in the situation room, stays in the situation room. But for us, it was one-heck of a Homeland entertainment.

 

The first half of Homeland’s tensely unraveling fourth season was concluded by its most suspenseful and breathless episode. It’s the second straight week that the remnants of Brody’s ill-fated arch were exhumed (sorry for the pun). But while “About a Boy” undressed Carrie’s emotional scars, “From A to B and Back Again” drilled Carrie’s excruciating chest box that the next episode (formidably entitled “Redux”) is an eruption upsettingly due. While Homeland doesn’t retreat on flashbacks to anchor its dramatic gravitas, Aayan ambling the same tight rope Brody trudged in S03 shoved Carrie to her breaking point. The similarity of their situation and how it dissolves to the distressing aftermath of Carrie’s failed operation was the risk the show purposefully took. Killing a character that the viewers had grown sympathy and proceeding with a “Quinn-tervention” rather than wiping the target was a gamble to start the season’s second half next week. But for anything else to be argued (which I’ll discuss later), “From A to B and Back Again” is a stupefying showcase of Homeland’s assets: the suspense of merely watching an operation spin out of control; the shock despite the hint of foreshadowing; and the superb performances that fleshes the strata of its characters.

 

Before delving to the core of S04E06, director Lesli Linka Glatter and writer Chip Johannessen deserve a shout-out for an exhilarating midseason episode. Glatter also directed “The Drone Queen” whose final minutes was intensely mortifying but she topped it in “From A to B and Back Again” as the simultaneous scenes in the situation room, the Pakistani countryside and the binding drone visual climaxed the serial espionage the show best delivers. Television has its own way of spoon-feeding what viewers must feel but for Homeland, it allows us to be critical of the thematic consequences and our own emotions from the mere viewing of the situation in the situation room. We’d seen Carrie Mathison and company in their surveillance at home/office/rented room, on the ground, and their bird’s eye view of a high-risk operation. From privacy issues to the conundrum of drone strikes over collateral damage, Homeland cunningly disengages a rhetoric of burning questions arising from yet another fractious situation. One can only gape and ruminate on the possibilities of the helpless fall-out if Carrie, Saul and Quinn switched places. Devastating as it was, “From A to B and Back Again” is a satisfying midseason conclusion that ushers a darker second half.

 

Aayan Ibrahim’s days are numbered from the moment he was captured by Carrie’s drone… and she watches remotely when his terrorist uncle killed him. He was the living reminder of the season’s central theme on the amorality of drone strikes and with him dead, the rueful juxtaposition of collateral damages became starker. Aayan’s final days were a painful foreshadowing (the prayer, phone call, ride to the other side), considering that his final moments closely resembled that of Brody’s in “Good Night”. All the same, Aayan’s eventual demise was gut-wrenching. Unlike Brody who had peacefully accepted his fate, Aayan was completely naïve of his imminent destination. The duplicitous betrayal by a family relative and a woman whom he just confessed his ill-born love was just shattering for a young man who had only been used as bait by both parties. An unconsciously victim, Aayan is just a boy after all – restless yet desperate, wary yet trusting. After orchestrating an ambush at the safe house (to my surprise), Carrie successfully prodded Aayan to contact and meet Haissam Haqqani but the terrorist is a step ahead by revealing a distraught Saul Berenson. Bidding his gratefulness to his nephew, Haqqani rewarded Aayan a headshot and as Carrie wrestles in control of an opportune drone strike, Peter Quinn galvanizes to shake her senses. “It’s Saul down there. Saul…” he pleads against her rigid willingness to sacrifice her mentor for the mission. That’s how the show segues from one fallen collateral damage to an endangered another.

 

It’s unclear how Haqqani decided to take Saul with him when he met Aayan. Could it be that ISI agent Tasneem Qureshi quickly relayed Dennis Boyd’s gathered evidence from the safe house? If so, the ISI is slyer than it appears — protecting a terrorist, staging an ambush of a CIA Station Chief and now, kidnapping an ex-CIA director. Or it could be that only Tasneem’s allegiances are in question. (SPECULATIVE) Recall that she confirmed to ISI General Aasar Khan in “About a Boy” that Saul was Carrie’s mentor. How would Haqqani discover that and use the same word to Aayan? Seeing Haqqani’s decoys slipped away onscreen is a frustrating fall-out that Carrie’s (first physical demonstration) venting of her anger was an understatement. But she contains herself in the last minutes, all the more alerting a tormenting manic episode that she has not yet unleashed for more than six months.

 

But the burning questions remain. Would Saul want Carrie to proceed with the drone strike, knowing that it will be the end of him? If they trade places, would Saul order the command knowing Carrie’s in danger? If Quinn had not stopped Carrie, will she still be hailed as The Drone Queen because of the successful mission or rebuffed on letting an American citizen, more notably an ex-CIA official, killed under her watch? Even before Saul appeared, Carrie was determined to strike despite Aayan’s presence. Will the reception of the drone outcome change if an innocent young Pakistani with familial ties to a terrorist or Saul was the price to pay? Homeland continues to knead its viewers as some found a new angle of condemning Carrie’s impetus on her call. I’d argue that taking the shot was the right operative move though the extent of Carrie’s descent to the rabbit hole could ultimately make her a monster that Vice President Walden and Abu Nazir were, regardless of who becomes the collateral. (But maybe that’s also the same reason why Quinn intervened, to prevent Carrie from doing to Saul what Haqqani did to his own nephew.) Losing Saul on the process would also reprieve him of the inquiry and/or torture that the Taliban has in store for him. Yet there’s no reason for killing off his character. Like Quinn opined, the emotional and psychological contentions crawl out. How could Carrie let her mentor-father figure be killed along with the terrorists? Had she not thought of the guilt and the emptiness that happens after? It’s hard to imagine the consequences of Carrie and Quinn’s (who also has his share of indecisions this episode) choices and viewers are left to deliberate the ending. I’d rather rationalize the scene and see how it plays in the season’s second half.

 

The end of S04E06 sees the pendulum of collateral damage swing from Aayan to Saul. To be honest, I am conflicted on Saul’s story line this season. He was sidelined by Carrie who wants to act independently from him; he unsuspectingly walks into a trap by the ISI; and the remaining season seems to focus on his extraction plan. There are two sides in looking at Saul’s situation. First is its glaring political magnitude that will cause friction on the relationship between the CIA and ISI, hand-in-hand with their national governments. How the ex-CIA director landed to one of the world’s top terrorist group and to make matters worse, coordinated by the ISI is a murky territory that the CIA has to clear up. Second, that person is Saul and it felt melodramatic that the show’s way of keeping him integrated in the story is by making him hostage. A veteran of Middle Eastern affairs, Saul could still keep his cool while exchanging wise words with terrorists, just like his insightful table conversations in “Iron in the Fire” but I’m certainly not looking forward to see him be tortured. On the other hand, I’d like to think of Saul’s captivity as an opportunity to explore not just his importance to the overall story but his sole importance to Carrie. I’m not quite sure that S04E06 has wholly portrayed Carrie processing the double whammy of Aayan’s death and Saul’s kidnapping because her rage in the last minute was the effect of her helplessness in the failed operation. It would be a sentimental prospect to revisit their relationship that has suffered a fissure last season. How Carrie will act to save Saul could lead to repairing their relationship but it all boils down on to her realization of Saul’s significance in her life. Though Aayan’s death did have an effect on her, I don’t think it’s enough for Carrie to bring herself back to the ground. Maybe Saul would complete the catalyst she needs in order to confront herself. Aayan’s chapter in Carrie’s life has expired and it’s time to discover how Saul fits into the bigger picture.

 

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I do have one concern which I’ll leave to discuss on the next episode recap in order to validate my thoughts but overall, “From A to B and Back Again” is the reboot’s best episode to date. One of the show’s most emotional deaths, Aayan would not be as affecting if it weren’t for Suraj Sharma. That was the veritable end of the road for his character and a proper send-off as well. Don’t get too attached to a guest character but for now, John Redmond is slowly growing in me. I hope Fara redeems herself after Carrie verbally flayed her. Pity that she’s relegated to containing hefty bags for the service of her own country. As for Quinn, he’s not actually doing a good job of caring for Carrie and criticizing her actions. He deserves a certain kick on next week’s episode. The brilliance of Claire Danes is overwhelming; every episode she dazzles like a diamond with the many rough edges of an allotrope.

 

Until next time. Happy ‘duck’ hunting.

 

NEXT EPISODE: “Redux”

TV Review: Homeland S04E05 “About a Boy”

There’s a hidden gem of having to re-watch this new season of Homeland, which I haven’t done for its past three seasons. Partly because it was an era I don’t want to revisit (particularly the second half of S02 and the whole S03) chronicling Carrie in her wrenching crusade to keep the love of her life alive, only to thrust him to the front line for the greater good. For sure, the tragedy of Carrie’s character is TV’s least enjoyable entertainment but who would deprive sympathy from her? That, and the fascinating ways her oscillating familiarity still manages to shock, keeps me hooked. Specifically for this episode, a second watch granted an insightful precedent to what looks like a fierce follow-up. Contrary to its title, last night’s episode is still about Carrie, with three scenes of her as the subject of conversation and intelligence gathering. But About a Boy is not just about her, nor the eponymous Aayan; but the emergence of new complications magnifying the stakes of its next episodes.

 

Transpiring the one-day turn of furtive events, About a Boy seemed to kindle S04’s frustrating, slow-burner feel. But looking closely at the calendar, the past five episodes happened swiftly in less than two weeks, with the characters already ripe of their respective high-stakes drama. The most threatening run-in is Saul’s kidnapping at the airport, orchestrated by ISI agent Tasneem Qureshi. Echoing ISI Colonel Aasar Khan from “Iron in the Fire”, it’s neither Saul as Carrie’s mentor nor Saul the private citizen that would simmer the ongoing geo-political spy game. Abducting the former CIA director en route to the mountainous Taliban territory should raise the American alarm, thus prompting its incumbent to land in Pakistan. Triggered by Sandy Bachman’s death, the convoluted domino effect further snarls the CIA and ISI, although the Pakistani intelligence has the upper-hand this week. Desperate to return in the game, Saul unsuspectingly took the obvious bait. Judging S04E06’s promo, Carrie possibly knowing Saul as hostage will flare up the situation room. There’s a comparison on her ill-conceived capture by Abu Nazir in “Two Hats” but Saul’s situation (and how it lead to that) is more believable than the dissenting S02 scheme.

 

More of Carrie’s emotional cracks surface the day after her tryst with Aayan as she lies her way to get his sympathy, with only two more days before her cover blows. The happenings in the safe house looked like homage to “The Weekend” but with the “Redux” episode still coming up, it convinced me that Carrie and Aayan won’t be spending S04E07 together. Carrie’s half-truths about her baby’s father successfully got Aayan’s attention but to see Carrie use the personal strife she has yet to confront is another miserable occasion of how much she sacrifices herself for the greater good. Carrie’s moments of genuine emotions is questioned than believed by others, and her mid-coital breakdown is categorized as a manipulative ploy along with the blurted ballad, “I f***ing love you, Quinn. You know that, don’t you?” Carrie’s justification of her controversial means becomes Quinn’s matchstick of searing into her work ethics. Their arm-braced, heated conversation materializes the ‘push-and-pull’ dynamic Rupert Friend has twice commented. Clearly Quinn is reacting not out of jealousy but as an agitated subordinate who lost track of their target and a non-practitioner of the ‘Mathison Method’. But instead of retorting “Mind you own f***ing business”, Carrie tersely explains herself and the scene ends with a classic Carrie-Quinn OC bout that only keeps the tension between them burning.

 

Speaking of business, grumpy Quinn is paired up with Fara as they check out Haissam Haqqani’s hiding place. Quinn, ever the cheerer (remember “I’m not. You’re good.”), keeps Fara focused despite her qualms and fills her in on the spy handbook. There’s a subtle moment when Fara asks Quinn on his acquaintance with Carrie and he swallows his curt replies; the silence in between were more telling. But for a second episode in a row, Fara shows how far she’s gone from the reluctant analyst in S03. Their attempt to track the cleric’s car failed (Quinn will be more infuriated to know who’s gagged in the compartment) but in Fara, patience to a novice spy is a virtue. Curious, brave and learning, she’s fast turning into the next female spy to root for. Although Fara’s still in the middle of the ‘Mathison Method’ crash course, it’s enlivening to see her stand up for herself, especially against her teacher (a face-off I’m very much looking forward to).

 

Back in the embassy, Dennis becomes Martha’s unknowingly biggest problem as he digs dirt on Carrie’s apartment (on ISI’s orders), only to see a picture with her daughter and her supply of medicine (how the wily Tasneem will use them against Carrie, we don’t know). The Boyds are becoming the Berensons 2.0 and I do hope that Martha could finally show how fierce she is as a woman in power (having been introduced as Carrie’s equally tough counterpart) and I can’t wait to see her find out the more unforgivable crime her husband has committed.

 

Just two weeks of operations in its five episodes, Homeland takes calculated strides to unwind its season-long mystery caught between international espionage and the personal lives of its characters. About a Boy felt like a breather before the intense first-half season capper but in some ways, it wasn’t. Saul’s kidnapping will add fuel to the fire and Carrie’s vulnerability is becoming more evident… And who said the new season is a slow-burner?

 

NEXT EPISODE: “From A to B and Back Again”

TV Review: Homeland S04E04 “Iron in the Fire”

New intelligence unraveled as Carrie and co. went further down the rabbit hole in IRON IN THE FIRE, an episode fully geared on the thrills of espionage not only wheeled on the CIA operations, but also torqued on its Pakistani counterpart. Finally emerging as part of the chess game than a plot device, the ISI sheds stealth-mode from tailing surveillance to a more tangible presence that further escalates the conspiracy that befell on the season four premiere. It’s the savory spy stuff that substantiates the progressive episode spawning more questions which reveals the bigger motive behind Sandy Bachman’s murder. The fear of the unknown is crippling but HOMELAND’s ability to play the con game of the unpredictable makes the show so compelling and a-rousing (coughs to Aayan). Ready the blankets and take a seat beside your new-found asset; let the recap begin!

 

New Girl

Working on foreign territory, it made sense that HOMELAND booked new characters who’ll wear the shoes of the Pakistan Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), the country’s largest intelligence service agency. The show’s depiction of its overseas settings is often criticized but admirably, HOMELAND has been grounded by the stark reality and remained neutral on tackling the political aspects of its omnipotent theme. I wonder how the portrayal of the ISI could add to the complex set-up but the idea of two agencies battling each other is intriguing, all the more that the face we see on the ground is a woman. Nimrat Kaur’s casting as ISI agent Tasneem Qureshi has been interesting and I can’t wait how involved her character will be in the season-long conflict. The thought of her going head-to-head with Carrie is even more exciting. Already proving herself in the misogynistic world of intelligence, S04 sees Carrie engaging on a new dynamic, ironically with the same gender. She’s got Fara to mentor, Martha to be her proxy-mentor/ally, and now Tasneem as a potential enemy (although Carrie doesn’t know her yet). Would it be that the new girl will push Carrie to the limit? We’ll see on the next episodes.

 

Mole 2.0

Speaking of Tasneem, she apprehended a certain professor who was revealed to be Sandy’s inside man on the drone strike’s coordinates… who turned out to be the Martha Boyd’s husband, Dennis. The Boyds scuffle on committing to their careers and marriage (Martha’s disheveled look and unaware treason of her husband got me anxious about her). Sandy forged a two-way street of intel exchange through Dennis and a Pakistani source whom he was supposed to meet before he died. But the question is, why did Dennis connive with Sandy to get those classified intel? What’s in it for him? Was he not aware that the ISI, as Tasneem said, is benefiting from? There are so many questions that lead to a dead-end. But has anyone noticed the parallel on Saul and Martha’s significant others? Mira was unknowingly sleeping with Andrew Lockhart’s hired agent in last season, but for Dennis, it’s a deep rabbit hole he’s drained himself into.

 

Most Valuable Player

Another big reveal last night (aside from the source of Sandy’s intel) is that Haissam Haqqani, the target of Carrie’s botched drone strike, is alive, thanks to Fara’s determined pursuit of Aayan. It’s an immense compensation for her gone-wrong meeting with him in “Shalwar Kameez”. The transition from meek to daring Fara was a welcome boost to Nazanin Boniadi’s character, now that she’s more expected to be seen on the ground while Carrie’s juggling being station chief and a handler (more to that later). She’s still learning the spy craft that teams her up with Max and they somehow make a more composed pair than the tension-filled Carrie and Quinn. Before Fara left the car, Max cautioned her to not do anything stupid, but don’t expect that dialogue to work out for the other two. I do like how their scenes (Fara and Max following Aayan while Carrie and Quinn argue a stake-out over another ISI agent) interplay thrillingly. The show is meatier if it treats viewers with well-executed covert operations and fastening them together in the end. It’s a tense and gripping entertainment that HOMELAND best delivers.

 

Bad Guy

Remember Carrie and Quinn’s snarky conversation during their surveillance in “New Car Smell”? They’re back behind the camera watching Farhad Ghazi’s footage but this time their talk becomes personal, which further attest on how much their working-personal relationship deepened for the past two seasons. Carrie once again asked Quinn why he didn’t go with her in Kabul and Quinn answers that covert operation was over for him after killing a child in Caracas. For a moment, Carrie’s voice breaks when she shouted ‘No’ upon Quinn’s sullen statement that he’s a bad guy. But instead she wants him focused on the job that he ultimately accepted despite his reservations. I was waiting for the concrete proof on how Quinn would be Carrie’s moral conscience (an actual dialogue, not just cursing) and this scene clicked to it. Many times in the episode did Quinn got into Carrie’s skin and her retaliation was enough to confirm it. I’m not exactly sure on how Carrie is ‘bad news’ to Quinn since she needed him for the mission. Is it considered bad if Quinn continues to prod her enmity in order to humanize her? But the notion of being the bad guy got me curious. Carrie and Quinn have their different methods in performing their job for the greater good. Her needing to hear “I’m a bad guy” seemed like Quinn’s strategy of having Carrie think about her job and what she has let it done to her. It’s not a question of who’s meaner and more culpable. It’s a thought-provoking move; especially when a viewer continues to digest the great lengths Carrie do for her job, which leads us to the final moment of the episode…

 

Mirror, Mirror

Carrie examines herself at the mirror, and pauses before she proceeds with her play on Aayan. To be honest, I wasn’t shocked on the culmination of Carrie’s seduction although at first I was peeved by the thought of it. What changed my mind? Maybe on how the first 45 minutes of the episode built to it and how well Claire Danes and Suraj Sharma calculatedly eased up on Aayan’s consensual permission to Carrie’s initiation. Carrie had used sex before to accomplish her operations but the necessity of doing it with Aayan comes to question. When did she realize that she has to seduce him, to make him emotionally (and physically, forgive the pun) attached to her? And her more professional job description as a station chief also raises an eyebrow to her latest act. I’m not an expert on Carrie’s psyche but based on the past three seasons, Carrie is more comfortable when she’s hands-on to her assets. (Related, but digressing) I think her being station chief comes with her brilliance and not her leadership skills (she’s more of an individual performer). But the more important thing is, Carrie knows what she is doing. She’s planned it all along and readied herself when the moment is ripe. She’s not as reckless like she was with a certain terrorist in “The Good Soldier”. Sex is part of her play but the tricky thing would be not letting herself be emotionally attached because that could just snap a band, if something awry goes off.

 

Oh, Saul also got two important dates in IRON IN THE FIRE, first is with an old friend (called Bunny) from the Pakistan army and second was from a younger official in the ISI. Turns out that Sandy is the sole target of the mob and why the ISI orchestrated the murder is still unknown. Saul is so desperate to be back in the game (I thought he’ll be leaving Pakistan soon?) But seeing Mandy Patinkin course his way through international politics with the Pakistani officials makes me reminiscent of the S01 Saul. I miss the bear.

The opening credits first hears the line “It’s Alice in f***ing wonderland” from Martha. Wait ‘till she knows what her husband’s done aside from plagiarizing. IRON IN THE FIRE got me convinced that the new season will see Carrie in her most dangerous fairy-tale yet. I’m all in the rabbit hole. Are you?

 

NEXT EPISODE: “About a Boy”